Posts Tagged: second world war

On questioning and contemplating

I’m in a bit of a Second World War binge at the moment. Just before I read Goodnight Mister Tom I sped through another favourite from when I was younger: Jackie French’s Hitler’s Daughter. A short book, only 135 pages long, it tells the story

On questioning and contemplating

I’m in a bit of a Second World War binge at the moment. Just before I read Goodnight Mister Tom I sped through another favourite from when I was younger: Jackie French’s Hitler’s Daughter. A short book, only 135 pages long, it tells the story

On resilient readers

The last time I read Goodnight Mister Tom by Michelle Magorin I was twelve years old, and reading it for class. I remember enjoying reading it – I remember thinking that finally I was reading a book for school that I actually

On resilient readers

The last time I read Goodnight Mister Tom by Michelle Magorin I was twelve years old, and reading it for class. I remember enjoying reading it – I remember thinking that finally I was reading a book for school that I actually

On tiny stories

I remember reading Carrie’s War when I was about eleven or twelve and being quite stuck by it. I can’t for the life of me remember what it was that stuck me about it, but I remember thinking about it quite a

On tiny stories

I remember reading Carrie’s War when I was about eleven or twelve and being quite stuck by it. I can’t for the life of me remember what it was that stuck me about it, but I remember thinking about it quite a

About reading about yourself

Recently, I talked about how a classic can expire, that it’s classicness can fade because it is no longer relevant to readers. The opposite can also occur. Books stay classics because they stay relevant – that is, there is something,

About reading about yourself

Recently, I talked about how a classic can expire, that it’s classicness can fade because it is no longer relevant to readers. The opposite can also occur. Books stay classics because they stay relevant – that is, there is something,

On stories by firelight

Yesterday I wrote about how I thought that in A Wizard of Earthsea, Ursula Le Guin portrayed her view that books, and words, are not as strong as experiencing real life. However, reading The Silver Sword by Ian Serraillier, I

On stories by firelight

Yesterday I wrote about how I thought that in A Wizard of Earthsea, Ursula Le Guin portrayed her view that books, and words, are not as strong as experiencing real life. However, reading The Silver Sword by Ian Serraillier, I